Something Fishy

ADHD comes with omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid deficiencies.

But upping your omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids may have little effect on your ADHD symptoms.  What gives? Recent research reveals that it’s all about the ratio.

ADHD means low levels of both but overall higher levels of omega-6 to omega-3.

So now you may say, well, I just need to increase my omega-3 levels, right? Oh, how I wish it were so simple.  Researchers have tried this with only some succesfish-2207845_1920s.  A supplement heavier on the omega-3 than omega-6 side may be better, as indicated by a study that found benefit from giving participants an omega-3/6 supplement containing mostly EPA and DHA (omega-3), with only 60mg of LA (omega-6).

Still, it seems you’re best off knowing your ratio.  And then knowing how much omega-3 (EPA and DHA, specifically) and omega-6 (LA or AA, specifically) you need to optimize it.

See here.

Go, Go, Go and Slow, Slow, Slow?

A few years ago, researchers at MIT showed that adults with ADHD have two brain networks that compete for their attention instead of “playing nice,” as they do for adults without ADHD.  These networks are essentially a go, go, go one that lights up when we have a task to do (“task-positive network”) and a slow, slow, slow one that activates when we have nothing to do and can daydream or let our minds wander (“defccv-jp-ngault mode network”).  Without ADHD, when one network has its turn to be active, the other one turns down…they cooperate.  With ADHD, they appear to often be active at the same time.  Imagine what that’s like.  If you have ADHD, you already know.  If only others could experience your brain to know what it’s like….

See for yourself.