Something Fishy

ADHD comes with omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid deficiencies.

But upping your omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids may have little effect on your ADHD symptoms.  What gives? Recent research reveals that it’s all about the ratio.

ADHD means low levels of both but overall higher levels of omega-6 to omega-3.

So now you may say, well, I just need to increase my omega-3 levels, right? Oh, how I wish it were so simple.  Researchers have tried this with only some succesfish-2207845_1920s.  A supplement heavier on the omega-3 than omega-6 side may be better, as indicated by a study that found benefit from giving participants an omega-3/6 supplement containing mostly EPA and DHA (omega-3), with only 60mg of LA (omega-6).

Still, it seems you’re best off knowing your ratio.  And then knowing how much omega-3 (EPA and DHA, specifically) and omega-6 (LA or AA, specifically) you need to optimize it.

See here.

It’s nothing personal.

This is for the loved ones of those with ADHD.

Yesterday, I sat with my husband and tried to just talk.  We are so busy doing things, we hardly ever just talk.  Ten minutes into it, I could tell his mind was elsewhere.  I let him know it looked like he was somewhere else mentally.  He said he was.  I asked what was going on, and he said he was “bored.”  “Ouch,” I said.

Then I remembered something.  It’s nothing personal.  I know hong-kong-1990268_1920what I tried to share with him would be quite fascinating to another psychology-lover.  But my husband has ADHD and becomes easily bored with things less exciting than a book such as The Martian.

He also prefers action to talk.  It’s hard to keep his attention.

As Thom Hartmann, author of The Edison Gene, points out those with ADHD constantly monitor the environment for what’s of high stimulation, with a swift ability to turn to these things.  If this high stimulation or need to act is lacking, they may shut down on you.  Kind of like your computer going into sleep mode.  When this happens, breathe and begin breakdancing (attention-getter!) or relax and remind yourself it’s nothing personal.  Really.  Their brains are just tuned to a different frequency.

 

Medicating Children

As the mother of a teenager with ADHD soon entering high school, I want to know the pros and cons of medication.  If you are a parenpill-1254786t reading this, you likely do, too.  And I will admit, I’m torn.

The research seems too unfinished for me to rely on it as much as I might like.

Consider that over 40 scholars from the UK, USA, Denmark, Italy, Germany, Switzerland and Australia will be reviewing  various “pharmacological interventions” to rank how well they work and their “tolerability profiles,” looking at these things for children, teens and adults.  The scholars note that “there is a lack of up-to-date and comprehensive evidence on how available ADHD drugs compare and rank” with regard to their ability to deliver desired results and to do so with tolerable side effects.  See more here.

But do we keep waiting for what seem to be more definitive answers? At what cost?

Consider this…recent research suggests that school could be a more rewarding experience for children and teens with ADHD who use medication for their symptoms.

Examining about 10, 0000 12-year-old twins, some who’d been followed since 7 years of age, researchers found that medication-free children with ADHD showed lower educational achievement than children with ADHD using methylphenidate (Ritalin, Concerta).  And the medicated children showed lower educational achievement than children without ADHD.  That is, ADHD appeared to lead to lower educational achievement but especially when unmedicated.  Plus ADHD symptoms predicted a negative educational trajectory from 14 to 16 years of age.  See study here.

Where does this leave us parents wanting our children to have the best chance at achieving what deep down really matters to them?

It leaves me leaning toward the test of experience.  I am willing to let my teen, when wishing to do so, swallow a pill as I (figuratively) swallow mine.

Meanwhile, I will keep combing the research….

“Falling Letters,” Short Film on Atypical Attention

More than anything else what I like about this film is how it shows that the way that others respond matters.  At various times, we have the power to crush or uplift one another.  If your child has ADHD, consider giving her/him a hug.  If you have ADHD, give yourself and the child you were a hug.  Just to start.

 178808500_da3d423575_o

“Falling Letters”